Just another WordPress.com site

Introduction…As patients or caregivers, we lack the narrative necessary to bring the names, acronyms, formulas and processes of genetics and gene therapy into focus.  Stories can be life changing and the story written in the multiple billion year strand of our DNA is filled with the letters and codes that tell those stories.  In the process of duplication, of translation and transcription of that code into proteins, mutations arise, sometimes for the good, sometimes not. Perhaps no one can tell this part of the story better than Professor Eric Lander, an MIT mathematician, scientists and geneticist, a teacher,  story teller and pioneer in sequencing the human genome. In this unit we are in Dr. Lander’s freshman genetics class at MIT.

    Starting with Unit Three, next week,  we explore some likely genetic causes and potential cures of our myeloproliferative diseases. The object is to convert some of the vital reports coming out of  labs and clinical trials from incomprehensible scientific abstracts into narratives we can understand and apply.  

====================================

Scope of Unit Two

In this second unit we complete the overview of the genetics portion of our seminar by considering how DNA moves from genes carrying the code of the genome to creation of the proteins needed for cell structure, function, and repair.

=====================================

This Unit has seven sections:

1. Vocabulary

2. The Central Dogma

3. Visual Aid: From RNA to Protein Synthesis

4 The Eric Lander MIT lectures

5. Test yourself

6. The BCR-ABL video (homework to prepare for next week’s unit)

7. Bonus videos

=====================================

(1) Vocabulary

Centromere

Chromosome

Chromatid

mRNA

Promoter

Protein

(At the www.genome.gov site find the word and its definition.  Click on “Illustration” as well as the brief comments by scientists while reading the definition. mRNA is not on that site, so head for Google.  The Wikipedia entry is good. )

===================================

(2)  The Central Dogma

The central dogma of molecular biology is DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) directs the synthesis of proteins through the intermediary of RNA (ribonucleic acid) and RNA directs the synthesis of proteins..   While DNA stores the code for protein synthesis, it is RNA that carries out the instructions in order to produce proteins. The order of bases (Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, and Uracil) in DNA  spell out the order in which the amino acid sequence of a specific protein is assembled. Messenber RNA molecules (mRNA) are synthesized from DNA templates (transcription) and proteins are synthesized from mRNA templates (translation).

===============================

(3)  Visual aid: You can see this process in the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJxobgkPEAo

and this short section from the PBS special “Cracking the Genetic Code” (Chapter 9m “Finding Cures is Hard,” from Genes to Proteins. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/genome/program.html

=============================

(4)  Reading Genes and Genomes, by Eric S. Lander, Ph.D  Howard Hughes Lecture Series, Human Genetics,

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/genomics/lectures.html  (58:35)

And here’s the webcast version of the same lecture that gives you the option to click on subjects within the talk

http://www.hhmi.org/lectures/webcast/ondemand/02webcast1/index.html

(Don’t miss the section illustratingsize of the human genome compared to Fifth Avenue in New York City.)

===============================

(5) Pop Quiz..test yourself:   Describe the role of DNA in the manufacture of individual proteins.  What role is played by mRNA? By chromosomes?  By histones? Ribosomes?  (This is a collaborative seminar.  E-mail any questions or insights  you might have to share with the others to zhenyasenyak@gmail.com)

==================================

(6)   Homework

Next week we consider the application of genetics and molecular biology to our myeloproliferative neoplasms.  Unit Three is devoted to the BCR-ABL oncogene, the Philadephia chromosome, and Gleevec.  Here’s the background:

http://www.dnai.org/d/index.html

This link takes you to the DNA Applications page of the  Cold Spring Harbor Lab  DNAI site,  At the bottom of the page, click on GENES and MEDICINE. At the top of the resulting page you’ll have four options. Click on  DRUG DESIGN

That will take you to the Gleevec and Philadelphia Chromosome page with several options. Play around as much as you like but at some point click on the PHILADELPHIA CHROMOSOME icon and follow the animation, the creation of the BCR-ABL oncogene.

==================================

(7) Bonus

(A) MIT Open Courseware, offers free classes in many areas and includes this lecture on experimental use of genetics by Eric Lander complete with a transcript. http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Biology/7-012Fall-2004/VideoLectures/detail/embed08.htm

(B) How does that long 6 feet long strand of DNA fit into the nuclei of every cell in our body? How do chromosomes form from DNA?. (This is another look at the role of histones, from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/dna/DNAi_packaging_vo2.html

(C) The MPD Foundation is a valuable source of information on clinical trials and breaking scientific  developments

http://mpdfoundation.org/

Unit Two:  Genetics for MPNs….From genes to proteins

 

Introduction…As patients or caregivers, we lack the narrative necessary to bring the names, acronyms, formulas and processes of genetics and gene therapy into focus.  Stories can be life changing and the story written in the multiple billion year strand of our DNA is filled with the letters and codes that tell those stories.  In the process of duplication, of translation and transcription of that code into proteins, mutations arise, sometimes for the good, sometimes not. Perhaps no one can tell this part of the story better than Professor Eric Lander, an MIT mathematician, scientists and geneticist, a teacher,  story teller and pioneer in sequencing the human genome. In this unit we are in Dr. Lander’s freshman genetics class at MIT.

    Starting with Unit Three, next week,  we explore some likely genetic causes and potential cures of our myeloproliferative diseases. The object is to convert some of the vital reports coming out of  labs and clinical trials from incomprehensible scientific abstracts into narratives we can understand and apply.  

====================================

Scope of Unit Two

In this second unit we complete the overview of the genetics portion of our seminar by considering how DNA moves from genes carrying the code of the genome to creation of the proteins needed for cell structure, function, and repair.

=====================================

This Unit has seven sections:

1. Vocabulary

2. The Central Dogma

3. Visual Aid: From RNA to Protein Synthesis

4 The Eric Lander MIT lectures

5. Test yourself

6. The BCR-ABL video (homework to prepare for next week’s unit)

7. Bonus videos

=====================================

(1) Vocabulary

Centromere

Chromosome

Chromatid

mRNA

Promoter

Protein

(At the www.genome.gov site find the word and its definition.  Click on “Illustration” as well as the brief comments by scientists while reading the definition. mRNA is not on that site, so head for Google.  The Wikipedia entry is good. )

===================================

(2)  The Central Dogma

The central dogma of molecular biology is DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) directs the synthesis of proteins through the intermediary of RNA (ribonucleic acid) and RNA directs the synthesis of proteins..   While DNA stores the code for protein synthesis, it is RNA that carries out the instructions in order to produce proteins. The order of bases (Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine, and Uracil) in DNA  spell out the order in which the amino acid sequence of a specific protein is assembled. Messenger RNA molecules (mRNA) are synthesized from DNA templates (transcription) and proteins are synthesized from mRNA templates (translation).

===============================

(3)  Visual aid: You can see this process in the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NJxobgkPEAo

and this short section from the PBS special “Cracking the Genetic Code” (Chapter 9m “Finding Cures is Hard,” from Genes to Proteins. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/genome/program.html

=============================

(4)  Reading Genes and Genomes, by Eric S. Lander, Ph.D  Howard Hughes Lecture Series, Human Genetics,

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/genomics/lectures.html  (58:35)

And here’s the webcast version of the same lecture that gives you the option to click on subjects within the talk

http://www.hhmi.org/lectures/webcast/ondemand/02webcast1/index.html

(Don’t miss the section illustratingsize of the human genome compared to Fifth Avenue in New York City.)

===============================

(5) Pop Quiz..test yourself:   Describe the role of DNA in the manufacture of individual proteins.  What role is played by mRNA? By chromosomes?  By histones? Ribosomes?  (This is a collaborative seminar.  E-mail any questions or insights  you might have to share with the others to zhenyasenyak@gmail.com)

==================================

(6)   Homework

Next week we consider the application of genetics and molecular biology to our myeloproliferative neoplasms.  Unit Three is devoted to the BCR-ABL oncogene, the Philadephia chromosome, and Gleevec.  Here’s the background:

http://www.dnai.org/d/index.html

This link takes you to the DNA Applications page of the  Cold Spring Harbor Lab  DNAI site,  At the bottom of the page, click on GENES and MEDICINE. At the top of the resulting page you’ll have four options. Click on  DRUG DESIGN

That will take you to the Gleevec and Philadelphia Chromosome page with several options. Play around as much as you like but at some point click on the PHILADELPHIA CHROMOSOME icon and follow the animation, the creation of the BCR-ABL oncogene.

==================================

(7) Bonus

(A) MIT Open Courseware, offers free classes in many areas and includes this lecture on experimental use of genetics by Eric Lander complete with a transcript. http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Biology/7-012Fall-2004/VideoLectures/detail/embed08.htm

(B) How does that long 6 feet long strand of DNA fit into the nuclei of every cell in our body? How do chromosomes form from DNA?. (This is another look at the role of histones, from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/dna/DNAi_packaging_vo2.html

(C) The MPD Foundation is a valuable source of information on clinical trials and breaking scientific  developments

http://mpdfoundation.org/

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Tag Cloud

%d bloggers like this: